Five years ago, Casey Patten and David Mazza had no experience in sandwich-making—not in the professional sense, at least. Even so, Philadelphia’s famous hoagies set them with high expectations for any meals served between two pieces of bread. Their move to D.C. left them feeling a serious void, so they decided to take matters into their own hands. The result: Taylor Gourmet. We chatted with Casey about all things sandwiches.

What makes a good hoagie?

The balance between meat, cheese and bread has to be perfect—each element has to complement the other. The bread has to have a great texture, a nice pull and chew, and meats and cheeses have to be of the highest quality.  We roast all of our meats in house—no cutting pre-processed meat out of bags here.

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Your favorite hoagie on the menu:

Federal Street (It’s the sandwich he whipped up for us during our visit. It’s filled with lots of meat and fresh mozzarella. Prepare to be full for awhile after eating.)

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A valuable lesson in sandwich-making:

It’s not just putting meat between bread…

How many hoagies do you eat a week?

A hoagie a day keeps the doctor away.

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When you’re not eating your own sandwiches, where are you dining in D.C?

Red Hem, Doi Moi, China Bistro, Houng Viet, Four Sisters, and Ghibellina.

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How would you describe D.C.’s current food scene?

Evolving.

Photos by Collin Hughes 

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