The Blog

· April 23rd, 2014

TO MEET · 04/22/2014

Let’s Talk Shop with Bonnie Tsang

Recently we had the pleasure of hosting photographer Bonnie Tsang at our very first Let’s Talk Shop: Social Media Q&A at our store in The Standard, Hollywood.

Recently we had the pleasure of hosting photographer Bonnie Tsang at our very first Let’s Talk Shop: Social Media Q&A at our store in The Standard, Hollywood. If you follow Bonnie on Instagram,  you’ll know she is on-the-go and seriously passionate about her career.  She’s accumulated a loyal following who value her great eye, excellent insight, and openness. We’re part of that group, and we were thrilled to hear from her about all things Instagram.

We asked Bonnie to recommend five Instagram accounts that we should all be following. Here, her key prescriptions:

1. @jengotch

2. @pencarlson

3. @life

4. @lifeserial

5. @burr0w

 

Photo by Sarah Shreves

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TO DO · 04/21/2014

To Do: Boston Literary Map

Happy Patriots’ Day to you, Boston. If you’re running the marathon (which if you are, what on EARTH are you doing reading this? Keep going!), the best of luck! If not, here’s a more leisurely way to get moving: a literary guide to the city.

Happy Patriots’ Day to you, Boston. If you’re running the marathon (which if you are, what on EARTH are you doing reading this? Keep going!), the best of luck! If not, here’s a more leisurely way to get moving: a literary guide to the city.

Harvard Yard: 2 Kirkland Street at the corner of Oxford Street
Henry James, The Bostonians

Boston Public Library: 700 Boylston Street, between Dartmouth and Exeter
Eleanor H. Porter, Pollyanna Grows Up

Ticknor, Fields & Co.: 124 Tremont Street
Matthew Pearl, The Dante Club 

Parker House Hotel: 60 School Street, corner of Tremont Street
Annie Fields, Memories of a Hostess

150 Newbury Street between Dartmouth and Exeter streets
H.P. Lovecraft, Pickman’s Model

Boston Athenaeum: 10 ½ Beacon Street
John P. Marquand, The Late George Apley

Scollay Square (now Government Center): corner of Tremont and Court Street
Sam Savage, Firmin: Adventures of a Metropolitan Lowlife

The Phoenix Club: 72 Mt. Auburn Street
Ben Mezrich, The Accidental Billionaires

Boston Public Garden: Arlington and Boylston streets
E.B. White, The Trumpet of the Swan

Mt. Vernon and Charles streets
Robert McCloskey, Make Way For Ducklings

(We’re at 83 Newbury Street.)

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TO READ · 04/18/2014

Reading Positions Redux

Once upon a time, we were screwing around the office and came up with a chart of essential reading positions.

Once upon a time, we were screwing around the office and came up with a chart of essential reading positions. It was fun. We have fun.

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When it came time to map out the interior of our newest store at 1209 Lexington Avenue, someone had the bright idea to make wallpaper out of our reading positions. The result is above.

If you’d like to swing by the store and try out a position or two, we’d definitely encourage that impulse.

Photos by Kevin Tachman

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TO BUY · 04/16/2014

Venn Diagram

Disclaimer: this is not a Venn diagram.

Disclaimer: this is not a Venn diagram.

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TO MEET · 04/16/2014

Desk Job: Selin Olmsted

A desk can tell you a lot about a person—and we think we’ve got some pretty interesting ones here in our office. These are the stories of our favorites (and the folks who sit behind them).

A desk can tell you a lot about a person—and we think we’ve got some pretty interesting ones here in our office. These are the stories of our favorites (and the folks who sit behind them).

Selin Olmsted, Eyewear Designer

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Frame samples

“I don’t think there is a single day of the year when there aren’t samples on my desk. We work with the same frames for two to three weeks, and then new samples magically appear!

“Some days of the month, there are so many frames and sketch print-outs here, I don’t see the table itself.”

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Sketches

“We do over 50-60 sketches per season for a core collection. They are everywhere: on the table, in the archive binders, on the boards—I’m surrounded by them. Help!”

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Millimeter ruler

“Other than the computer, this is the single most important tool on my desk. Without it, I can’t sketch, measure, or review. It’s a tiny fellow, so it frequently gets lost under piles of paper—but somehow it shows up at the end of the day.”

Yellow clips

“I love them. They are happy and energetic—and I enjoy seeing them any time of the day.”

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Brazilian Agate Coasters

“Since this wooden table has no finish to protect it, any glass we put on it leaves a mark—these are a staple in our design corner.

“Being designers, there was a lot of back and forth on which ones to go with, but we decided on the Brazilian Agate Coasters. We got them from The Evolution Store (our SoHo neighbors). I’m so in love with the look of them that I recently thought about using their patterns as inspiration for a new color.”

 

Photos by Kelsey Rose

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TO DO · 04/15/2014

Eight Ways to Use Your Glasses

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TO DO · 04/14/2014

To Do: Eating with Danny Meyer

Does the name Danny Meyer sounds familiar? If not his name, then perhaps some of his beloved restaurants: Union Square Café (now 29 years old), Shake Shack, Gramercy Tavern, Maialino, Blue Smoke, and more.

Does the name Danny Meyer sound familiar? If not his name, then perhaps some of his beloved restaurants: Union Square Café (now 29 years old), Shake Shack, Gramercy Tavern, Maialino, Blue Smoke, and more. Spending a meal at any of them are Experiences with a capital-E, thanks to his team’s dedication to serving up crazy-good service and food.

A couple weeks ago, we welcomed Danny and a few folks from of his Union Square Hospitality Group for pulled pork sliders, macaroni and cheese, and other princely treats from Blue Smoke. Despite the decadent spread, nobody snoozed while the restaurateur talked about his career path, the secret to good customer service, and French fries.

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Here are six things you didn’t know about Mr. Meyer:

1. He almost became a lawyer

“It was literally the eve of my LSATs. My uncle was looking at me: ‘What’s eating you? Do you have any idea how long you’re going to be dead? A hell of a lot longer than you’re going to be alive. Why would you do anything you don’t have passion for?’”

2. He started without a plan.

“I knew nothing. Opening Union Square Café was one big mosquito bite: all you hear is ‘Don’t scratch it,’ but you don’t have a choice. I was going to open it to give myself relief. I was also deathly afraid of opening a second restaurant because of bankruptcy, but my favorite chef at the time, Tom Colicchio, had a restaurant that had gone out of business, and his favorite was Union Square Café. He came to me and said, ‘I want my next restaurant to be with you.’ These were all complete accidents; it was opportunity knocking and it felt like the right time.”

3. He thinks IQ is less important than EQ (or rather, HQ).

“Your Hospitality Quotient is a wiring, just like IQ. IQ measures your ability to learn stuff, and HQ is similar: it’s not something you can change a lot. Hospitality Quotients describe the way it makes you feel good to do thoughtful things for other people. It’s hard to measure. I can feel it about a zip code away because I’ve been doing it so long. When was the last time you went to a dentist with high HQ? You might get better but they don’t make you feel better.

4. He still tries to impress his mother.

“My mom hates everything I cook.”

5. He treats his staff good, like a restaurateur should.

“Our big a ha! moment came right after opening Gramercy Tavern twenty years ago. That whole year I’d been told that the customer is always right, and I don’t think that’s wrong; I just think it’s in the wrong order. You cannot beat your staff into taking great care of your guests. If you want to have remarkable customer experiences, you never put your customer first. If you want to make the most money, you would never put your investor first.”

6. He cares deeply about French fries.

“You cannot have a company [Shake Shack] where you care deeply about sourcing your products and then give people frozen French fries with chemicals on them. I love crinkle fries—they’re really effective in catching cheese sauce. But now we’re bringing in fresh potatoes, hand-cutting them (which takes up about three times the space), frying them twice to get the right consistency, and training people. It’s a lot harder than saying, ‘Take scissors, open bag, pour in fryer.’ One of them tastes like a potato, one of them tastes like something else. Crinkle fries require less storage, a lot less labor, and they taste consistent, but potatoes and salt is a much better way to go.”

Photo of Danny Meyer by Ellen Silverman

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